Tetla Recipe | Colocasia Leaves Curry | Kesuvina Gantu Recipe – Kotians Passion

Tetla Recipe |  Colocasia Leaves Curry | Kesuvina Gantu Recipe – Kotians Passion

Tetla Recipe | Colocasia Leaves Curry | Kesuvina Gantu Recipe with a detailed photo and video recipe. One of the forgotten dishes of the Mangalore region is ‘tetla recipe’ (tetla – knotted colocasia leaves). This is coconut based gravy with colocasia leaves, Mangalore cucumber, jackfruit seeds and green gram. The most fascinating part is that the colocasia leaves are not diced but rolled and knotted. This dish is prepared during the month of aati (July – August), as the colocasia leaves that grow during the rainy season abundantly in the coastal region of Karnataka.

colocasia leaves recipe

During the rainy season, colocasia leaves grow generously and you get healthy leaves filled with good health properties. There are many varieties of colocasia leaves grown in coastal Karnataka with the onset of monsoon and some are available in abundance throughout the year. All varieties of colocasia leaves grow like weeds all around. The difference in the texture, the thickness of the leaves and steams of different varieties of colocasia make them suitable for a particular type of dishes for a particular type of cooking. It is very impotent to know that not all colocasia leaves are edible and some leaves are very itchy. So you have to be very careful when choosing the leaves.

colocasia leaves
Beru kesu ( ‘beru chevu’ in Tulu ) only grow onset of monsoon in Mangalore – Udupi region. This variety of colocasia leaves are super soft & less itchy. This variety is best to be used in pathrode

The most common varieties of colocasia used in Mangalore are beru kesuvina ele(only seen in monsoon), mara kesu(grows on trees), black steamed colocasia plants, caladium bicolour, bombay alvo etc…

This tetla recipe is complex and time-consuming, so this is the one reason why this recipe is rarely made in today’s time-pressed kitchens. The process of hand rolling and knotting each colocasia leaf is time and labour intensive. In the past families were large, siblings and cousins would team up to make this tetla gassi.

tetla
Tetla (knotted colocasia leaves)

‘Tetla’ is a Tulu language word, it means knotted colocasia leaves. Always tetla cooked along with Mangalore cucumber, jackfruit seeds and green gram, as colocasia leaves are considered to heat the body and the other three helps nullify its effect. The gravy is cooked with lots of coconuts, seasoned with dry red chilli and flavoured with souring ingredients tamarind or regional ambade (hog plums) or sone da tappu (type of creeper having very sour leave)- that lend it an appetising tangy taste. Usually accompanied with rice for lunch or dinner.

There are many varieties of dishes prepared using colocasia leaves and its stem. They are pathrode recipe, colocasia leaves chutney, colocasia stem curry, kesuvina berina palya etc…

Finally, I would like to highlight my other Mangalore cuisine collections with this post of Tetla Recipe. It includes recipes like ananas sasivebasale kudu gassitajank palyaharive soppu palyatajank neer dosekaadu peere sukkakembal picklewild mango curry. Further, I request you to check my other recipes collection like,

Recipe Card For Tetla Recipe:

Tetla Recipe | Colocasia Leaves Curry | Kesuvina Gantu Recipe

One of the forgotten dishes of the Mangalore region is tetla recipe (tetla – knotted colocasia leaves). This is coconut based gravy with colocasia leaves, Mangalore cucumber, jackfruit seeds and green gram. The most fascinating part is that the colocasia leaves are not diced but rolled and knotted. This dish is prepared during the month of aati (July – August), as the colocasia leaves that grow during the rainy season abundantly in the coastal region of Karnataka.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Resting time for colocasia leaves12 hrs
Total Time13 hrs
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Indian, mangalore cuisines
Servings: 6 people
Author: Yashashwini Kotian

Ingredients

stneidergni

  • 15 number colocasia leaves tender
  • 1 number mangalore cucumber
  • 15 number jackfruit seeds peeled
  • ½ cup green gram soaked in water
  • salt to taste
  • oil for cooking

for masala paste

  • 7 to 8 byadagi red chilli
  • 1 tbsp coriander seeds
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • ¼ tsp methi seeds
  • 1 tsp mustard seeds
  • 1 cup coconut
  • large lemon sized tamarind
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • ¼ tsp turmeric powder

for tempering

  • 3 tbsp oil
  • 1 red chilli broken
  • 1 tsp mustard seeds
  • 4 cloves garlic crushed
  • few curry leaves optional

Instructions

  • Wash colocasia leaves nicely and cover all leaves in soft cotton cloths, keep it aside for one day. This process makes colocasia leaves softer and as they are easy to roll and knott.
  • Then next day roll the soft tender colocasia leaves into thin pencil-thick rolls. Then knott the rolled leaves into what we call 'tetla' in tulu. Repeat the same procedure for all leaves and keep them aside.
  • Wash the mangalore cucumber well and chop it into cubes with the peel on. And also peel the jackfruit seeds and keep them aside. Soak ½ cup of green gram(moong)for about 1 hour, so that it cooks well along with colocasia leaves. Soaking green grams for longer ensure they cook well fast.
  • Heat pan, add 7 to 8 byadagi red chilli and roast on low flame using little oil. when it puffs up, remove it from flame and keep it aside to cool down.
  • Further, add 1 tbsp of coriander seed, 1 tsp cumin seeds, 1 tsp mustard seeds, ¼ tsp methi seeds to pan and roast on low flame. When it is aromatic, remove it from the pan and keep it aside to cool down.
  • Next, transfer all roasted and cooled ingredients to mixi jar and add 1 cup of grated coconut, large lemon sized tamarind, ¼ tsp turmeric powder, 4 cloves garlic. Add little water and grind into a fine paste.
  • Take a pressure cooker, add peeled 15 jackfruit seeds, one chopped mangalore cucumber, ½ cup soaked green gram and 15 knotted colocasia leaves. Add salt to taste and little water to cook. Cook until 1 whistle and let it cool down for 10 minutes.
  • Then open the pressure cooker, add the grounded masala paste and little water to adjust the consistency, mix gently.
  • Cover and let it simmer until the rawness of masala goes off.
  • Finally, for tempering take a pan to add 3 tbsp oil, ½ tsp mustard seed, 4 cloves of crushed garlic, one broken red chilli and few curry leaves. Pour it into tetla curry and mix gently.
  • Serve tetla gassi with rice for lunch and dinner.

Video

Notes

  • Always select tender colocasia leaves because it is very soft and easy to tie knot.
  • You can use any variety of colocasia leaves to make this curry but they make a huge difference to the end dish. ‘Beru kesu’ (only seen in monsoon) variety of colocasia leaves just melts in your mouth after cooking them well unlike the other variety of colocasia leaves that remain a little fibery even after proper cooking. If you can’t find ‘beru kesu’ variety, then use tender most leaves of any other variety of colocasia leaves.
  • Don’t overcook the colocasia leaves but make sure that colocasia leaves are cooked properly. Any undercooked colocasia leaves will mess with your mouth, throat and itch. This recipe also calls for a little excess of tamarind to prevent any itching from the colocasia leaves.
  • On cooking, the colocasia knots might open up and dissolve in the curry. So be gentle while mixing the curry.
  • If you cooking tetla gassi to offer the gods on the festive occasion, then you can skip adding garlic and onion.
  • You can make the green gram sprout instead of just soaking it in water.
  • You can also add hog plums(regional ambade) for appetising tangy taste.

How to make tetla recipe with step by step photo:

  • Wash colocasia leaves nicely and cover all leaves in soft cotton cloths, keep it aside for one day. This process makes colocasia leaves softer and as they are easy to roll and knott.
  • Then next day roll the soft tender colocasia leaves into thin pencil-thick rolls. Then knott the rolled leaves into what we call ‘tetla’ in tulu. Repeat the same procedure for all leaves as shown in the picture below and keep them aside.
  • Wash the mangalore cucumber well and chop it into cubes with the peel on. And also peel the jackfruit seeds and keep them aside. Soak ½ cup of green gram(moong)for about 1 hour, so that it cooks well along with colocasia leaves. Soaking green grams for longer ensure they cook well fast.
  • Heat pan, add 7 to 8 byadagi red chilli and roast on low flame using little oil. when it puffs up, remove it from flame and keep it aside to cool down. Further, add 1 tbsp of coriander seed, 1 tsp cumin seeds, 1 tsp mustard seeds, ¼ tsp methi seeds to pan and roast on low flame. When it is aromatic, remove it from the pan and keep it aside to cool down.
  • Next, transfer all roasted and cooled ingredients to mixi jar and add 1 cup of grated coconut, large lemon sized tamarind, ¼ tsp turmeric powder, 4 cloves garlic. Add little water and grind into a fine paste.
  • Take a pressure cooker, add peeled 15 jackfruit seeds, one chopped mangalore cucumber, ½ cup soaked green gram and 15 knotted colocasia leaves. Add salt to taste and little water to cook. Cook until 1 whistle and let it cool down for 10 minutes.
  • Then open the pressure cooker, add the grounded masala paste and little water to adjust the consistency, mix gently. Cover and let it simmer until the rawness of masala goes off.
  • Finally, for tempering take a pan to add 3 tbsp oil, ½ tsp mustard seed, 4 cloves of crushed garlic, one broken red chilli and few curry leaves. Pour it into tetla curry and mix gently.
  • Serve tetla gassi with rice for lunch and dinner.
tetla gassi

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